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Comet Hartley 2 - TMB 92

© 2014 Klaus Brasch






The following was retrieved from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia, at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/103P/Hartley_2 on March 1, 2014

Comet Hartley 2

"Comet Hartley 2, designated as 103P/Hartley by the Minor Planet Center, is a small periodic comet with an orbital period of 6.46 years. It was discovered by Malcolm Hartley in 1986 at the Schmidt Telescope Unit, Siding Spring Observatory, Australia. Its diameter is estimated to be 1.2 to 1.6 kilometres (0.75 to 0.99 mi).

Hartley 2 was the target of a flyby of the Deep Impact spacecraft, as part of the EPOXI mission, on 4 November 2010, which was able to approach within 700 kilometers (430 mi) of Hartley 2 as part of its extended mission. As of November 2010 Hartley 2 is the smallest comet which has been visited. It is the fifth comet visited by spacecraft, and the second comet visited by the Deep Impact spacecraft, which first visited comet Tempel 1 on 4 July 2005.

Comet Hartley 2 is a small Jupiter-family comet having an orbital period of 6.46 years. It was discovered by Malcolm Hartley in 1986 at the Schmidt Telescope Unit, Siding Spring Observatory, Australia. It has the perihelion near the Earth's orbit at 1.05 AU from the Sun.

The comet passed within 0.12 AU (18,000,000 km; 11,000,000 mi) of Earth on 20 October 2010, only eight days before coming to perihelion (closest approach to the Sun) on 28 October 2010. Throughout North America, during early November 2010, the comet was visible around midnight without interference from the Moon.

Despite its current close passage by Earth's orbit, the comet is not yet a known source of meteor showers. However, that could change. Dust trails from the recent returns of 103P/Hartley 2 move in and out of Earth's orbit, and the 1979-dust trail is expected to hit in 2062 and 2068.

After the 2010 perihelion passage, not accounting for nongravitational forces, Hartley 2 is estimated to come back to perihelion around 20 April 2017."

The license terms of this written work from Wikipedia may be found at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/









The following was retrieved from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia, at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comet_Hartley on March 1, 2014

Malcolm Hartley

"Malcolm Hartley is an English-born astronomer currently based in the Siding Spring Observatory in Australia. He's best known for his discovery and co-discovery of 8 comets in the 1980s, among them 79P/du Toit-Hartley, 80P/Peters-Hartley, 100P/Hartley 1, 103P/Hartley 2, 110P/Hartley 3, and C/1984 W2 (Hartley). Unfortunately for Hartley, in 2002, "the Anglo-Australian Observatory retrofitted its Schmidt to perform multi-object spectroscopy, essentially halting all astrophotography with the telescope and ending any future possibility for comet discovery".

Hartley visited the NASA JPL facility in Pasadena, CA, in November 2010 to witness the EPOXI mission flyby of comet 103P/Hartley 2 on 4 November 2010. Media articles and photos are available at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?release=2010-368. This includes a photograph of Malcolm Hartley.

The asteroid 4768 Hartley (1988 PH1) was named in his honour, being deputy astronomer of the U.K. Schmidt telescope at Siding Spring, with which this minor planet was discovered."

The license terms of this written work from Wikipedia may be found at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/





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