Photo Galleries



    Members w/pages



    Science News








Click here for

The August 21, 2017 Eclipse Info from NASA








Activities for July, 2017



Saturday, July 8, 2017

Dr. Audrey Thirouin, Lowell Observatory


Title: “Contact Binary in the Trans-Neptunian Belnomy”

A contact binary is a system of two separated objects almost in contact, but it can also be an object consisting of two lobes in contact (bi-lobed object with a peanut/bone shape). This kind of peculiar system/object is found across all the small body populations in our Solar System, from the Near-Earth Objects population to the Trans-Neptunian belt.

Contact binaries in the Trans-Neptunian belt are not resolvable with the Hubble Space Telescope because of the small separation between the system's components. Only light curves with a characteristic V-shape/U-shape at the minimum/maximum of brightness and a large amplitude can identify these objects. Despite an expected high fraction of contact binaries, so far only one has been found in the Trans-Neptunian belt. If the contact binaries are so common, where are they?



Board Meeting
Thursday - ( 7:00 pm )

July 27, 2017



Club Observing
Saturday - ( at Sunset )

July 22, 2017 ( Sunset: 7:40 pm )



Williams Public Viewing
Friday - ( at Sunset )

July 28, 2017 ( Sunset: 7:35 pm )

Directions for Williams

Location: Glassburn Park - in the natural area west of Rod’s Steakhouse parking lot. Take I40 west. Exit 165 into Williams. The park is about 2-3 blocks after the hill, just past the edge of town on the right.












What's New in July, 2017



2017 : Jan || Feb || Mar || Apr || May || June || July || Aug || Sept || Oct || Nov || Dec








Home || About || Membership || Calendar



Join us || Outreach || Flagstaff || Photos || Articles || Observing Sites || Weather || Links || Site Map



Coordinated Universal Time   ||   National Weather Service



info@coconinoastro.org



















( What's New! )









  ( Items for sale )




    Weather



    CAS Photo OTM



    Citizen Science